Regular Expressions – new version

Just a quick post tonight to let you all know, I’ve added a new page for downloads, which contains a new version of the regular expressions add-in, compatible with Excel 2007 and later. I’ve added in a couple of utility functions for convenience (mine more than yours but you might find them useful), and a form to evaluate regular expressions against test strings. And there’s even documentation!

The documentation gives a (very) brief intro to the uses and abuses of regular expressions, a run-down of the worksheet functions in the add-in and some examples of their use. Here are a couple of those, I hope you find them useful.

Matching cells which contain variations on a word

There are some words in the English language which Americans, god bless them, spell in their own special way. However, given input on the spreadsheet from users who spell both ways (correctly and incorrectly), you may wish to match both variations of words like ‘realise’ (‘realize’) and ‘colour’ (‘color’).
The pattern to match realise/realize is simple: \breali(s|z)e\b
The word boundary markers ensure we are looking at a complete word, and the alternation of (s|z) means that we match both versions.
Applying the ISRXMATCH formula demonstrates this is successful:

Validating Email Addresses

Given a list of email addresses in a column on a spreadsheet, we wish to ensure that these stick to a form which at least obeys some of the rules governing the format of email addresses. As these are going to be used by a script to send emails, we wish to minimise the number of undeliverable responses due to invalid addresses. The basic rules we specify for these addresses are as follows:
The username part of the address contains one or more alphanumeric characters, and possibly some additional special characters. This is followed by a single @ sign, followed by the domain name, which consists of one or more alphanumeric and special characters, ending with a dot followed by the top-level domain. This must contain only alphanumeric characters, and there must be between 2 and 6 of these. The address should be the entire content of the cell, so the beginning and ending anchors are used at the start and end of the pattern. Case is unimportant, so the case_sensitive flag is set to false.
The pattern is as follows: ^[a-z0-9_%.+-]+@[a-z0-9-.]+\.[a-z]{2,6}$
This is then used in ISRXMATCH – a valid email address according to our rules above will return true:

The second address in the list fails due to the whitespace in the username, whereas the fourth fails because the domain name does not include a top-level domain part of a dot followed by 2-6 letters.
I borrowed this regex from http://www.regular-expressions.info/email.html. As well as a couple of alternative regexes to cover some edge cases which the above doesn’t catch, this page also discusses why email addresses can be tricky, and why you shouldn’t go overboard trying to cover every exception.

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